Research reports

The Australia-China science boom

December

In the mid-2000s Australia had delivered a China-led mining boom that continues today. Australia’s success as a producer of raw materials such as iron ore is well known. While domestic demand is negligible, in 2019 Australia’s iron ore exports totalled $96.1 billion (Australian Government Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, 2020). The partner that has made this possible is China, buying 82.2 percent of Australia’s exports. China has also been a major supplier of the capital needed to develop Australian mines (Ferguson et al., 2020).

COVID-19 and the Australia-China relationship’s zombie economic idea

December

Executive Summary

Dealing with commercial legal risks in the People's Republic of China: a primer for Australian businesses

December

Despite major legal reforms over the past two decades, the legal system in the People’s Republic of China (PRC) remains very different from Australia. Businesses that trade or invest in the PRC need to be keenly aware of these differences in order to minimise the risks of legal disputes or becoming a target of the PRC government’s anti-corruption campaign. Australian businesses also require a basic understanding of dispute resolution options in the PRC – litigation versus arbitration or mediation – and what to expect when a business relationship in the PRC turns ugly.

Australia-China: a series of reflections

December

Note: ‘Australia-China: a series of reflections’ was originally published in December 2019 as the Pearls and Irritations China Series. Pearls and Irritations is a public policy blog founded and managed by John Menadue AO, who has had a distinguished career in the private sector and in the Australian Public Service.

Preface

Fintech payments innovation and cross-border payments integration between Australia and China

December

Executive summary

Fintech payments innovation in China, driven by in-app mobile payments usage, is transforming the way in which people and businesses pay for goods and services.

Small grey rhinos: understanding Australia’s economic dependence on China

December

Executive Summary

Australia lives with an acute ‘fear of abandonment’.

In security terms this fear has underpinned Australian foreign policy settings for decades. Recently, doubts about the reliability of the United States as Australia’s security guarantor have sent Australian government ministers on a mission to convince America that ongoing – and expanded – engagement with Australia’s neighbourhood is in its own interests.

Australia’s strategic hedging in the Indo-Pacific: A ‘third way’ beyond either China or the US

December

The China-Australia Free Trade Agreement and Australia's labour market: claims versus evidence

December

Executive Summary

- When the China-Australia Free Trade Agreement (ChAFTA) was signed in 2015 claims were made that Australian jobs would go to Chinese workers and safety standards on Australian work sites would fall. 

Do the claims stack up? Australia talks China

December

When Australia talks about China, the China Opportunity and the China Challenge forms part of the discourse. The China Opportunity reflects the enormous economic benefits that Australia already derives from its $184 billion trade relationship with China, along with the potential for this to grow even further as 850 million more Chinese reach middle class status by 2030, placing Australian beef, wine, education and tourism within their grasp. Strands of China’s foreign policy also favour an approach of multilateral engagement in line with the preferences of the Australian government.

Connecting the Asia-Pacific: Australian participation in China's regional infrastructure initiatives

December

Executive summary

Major ‘infrastructure gaps’ plague the Asia-Pacific region, constraining economic integration and undermining development efforts.

- In 2013, China launched two new projects – the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) and the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) – to lead regional efforts to plug these infrastructure gaps.