Research reports

CAG-ACRI South China Sea Conference Report

December

On February 10-11 2017 the Australia-China Relations Institute (ACRI) at the University of Technology Sydney in collaboration with the Centre on Asia and Globalisation at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore co-hosted a conference on the South China Sea (SCS).

Myth-busting Chinese corporations in Australia

December

Among policymakers, media and the broader public, confusion reigns supreme when it comes to Chinese corporations. State-owned enterprises (SOEs) are assumed to be blindly following Chinese Communist Party (CCP) or security service orders with little concern for their own commercial interests. And private Chinese firms are conflated with SOEs and viewed as pawns in the CCP’s regional expansion strategy, despite the enormous growth of the Chinese private sector over the past two decades.

Chinese-language media in Australia: Developments, challenges and opportunities

December

On September 8 2016 the Australia-China Relations Institute (ACRI) at the University of Technology Sydney released an independent report on Chinese-language media in Australia.    

The report is authored by Wanning Sun, a Professor of Media and Communication at UTS with a decade of experience conducting academic research into the sector.

Professor Sun details a rapidly changing media landscape that outsiders on the one hand find inscrutable but also regularly place at the heart of the Chinese government’s attempts to exert soft power.  

Keating and China

December

On August 30 2016 the Australia-China Relations Institute (ACRI) at the University of Technology Sydney presented the fourth instalment of our ‘Prime Ministers Series’ devoted to the China policies of Australian Prime Ministers. Paul Keating was Treasurer from 1983 to 1991 and Prime Minister from December 1991 until March 1996. One of Mr Keating’s key priorities both as Treasurer and then Prime Minister was improving the competitiveness of Australia in a global market.

THE SINO-AUSTRALIAN CATTLE AND BEEF RELATIONSHIP

December

The cattle and beef trade exemplifies Australia’s agricultural integration into Asia, especially with respect to China. Beef exports to China increased 13-fold between 2011-12 and 2013-14 to become Australia’s fourth largest export market, with projections that the trade could be worth a cumulative total of A$100 billion between 2014 and 2030. Additional stimulus was generated by the signing of the China-Australia Free Trade Agreement (ChAFTA) and a live cattle export protocol, with projections that it could lead to exports of one million head per year.

Building Chinese Language Capacity in Australia

December

A report commissioned by the Australia-China Relations Institute (ACRI), written by Dr Jane Orton, reveals the lack of Australian students enrolling in Chinese language study.

- Since 2008 the number of students learning Chinese in Australian schools has doubled to 172,832 – this is 4.7 percent of total school student numbers.

- There has been an overall drop over the past eight years of some 20 percent in the number of non-background classroom learners taking Chinese to around just 400.

Erase and rewind: Britain's Relations with China

December

The UK was the first western country to sign up to the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB). It aims to become the world's leading RMB trading hub. In 2015 President Xi Jinping and Prime Minister David Cameron signed more than 40 billion pounds worth of deals.

The report finds that the UK is running a decidedly pragmatic China policy based on its national interests, aimed at securing the economic opportunities China presents.

Author: Kerry Brown, Director of the Lau China Institute and Professor of Chinese Studies, King's College London

NAB-ACRI Australia-China Business Engagement Index - Chinese version (澳中企业参与指数)

December

The Australia-China Relations Institute (ACRI) in partnership with National Australia Bank (NAB) have published the first-ever report comparing attitudes of Chinese and Australian business leaders towards bilateral engagement.

Two polls were conducted in parallel, with NAB surveying 580 Australian business leaders and ACRI surveying 1000 Chinese-resident business leaders. The findings were then analysed and compared, resulting in the new Australia-China Business Engagement Index which will be updated bi-annually.

NAB-ACRI Australia-China Business Engagement Index

December

The Australia-China Relations Institute (ACRI) in partnership with National Australia Bank (NAB) have published the first-ever report comparing attitudes of Chinese and Australian business leaders towards bilateral engagement.

Two polls were conducted in parallel, with NAB surveying 580 Australian business leaders and ACRI surveying 1000 Chinese-resident business leaders. The findings were then analysed and compared, resulting in the new Australia-China Business Engagement Index which will be updated bi-annually.

Auditing the Australia-China Relationship

December

This audit of the Australia-China relationship, commissioned by the Australia-China Relations Institute (ACRI) at the University of Technology Sydney, reveals that Australia’s bilateral economic, diplomatic, cultural and defence ties with China are, overall, solid in comparison with those of Canada, France, Germany, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea and the US. On no criteria included in this paper did Australia score exceptionally badly — as can be seen in Appendix: Companion Table.