Foreign affairs

Chinese students in Australia: Do we protest too much?

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: This article appeared in the Lowy Institute for International Policy's blog, The Interpreter, on September 21 2017.

China relations: How Canada does it

December

China is Canada's second largest trading partner. In 2016, two-way goods trade was worth C$60 billion. This is up 28 percent on five years ago. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has voiced a desire to double trade between Canada and China by 2025. Last year also saw Chinese investment in Canada top C$7 billion. There are risks, however, should the US-China relationship deteriorate, or if China decides to divert purchases to the US rather than Canada to reduce the trade surplus with the former. How is Canada managing these challenges?


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Date
December
Time
2:45 PM
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Why Australia is missing the strategic train in Asia

December

By Bob Carr

Note: This article appeared in The Australian Financial Review on September 14 2017.

Recent Opposition statements on China

December

In July the Australia-China Relations Institute (ACRI) reported on an apparent tilt in the China policy of Canberra, reflected in speeches by Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and Foreign Minister Julie Bishop (see ACRI fact sheet ‘Australia’s tilt on China).[1] Recently, however, the opposition Labor Party appears to be differentiating itself on China policy. This is reflected in three recent speeches by Shadow Minister for Foreign Affairs Penny Wong.

ACRI Chinese History Series: The Chinese and the White Australia Policy

December

On September 13 the Australia-China Relations Institute (ACRI) at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) presented the second event in their Chinese History Series. Dr Jayne Persian from the University of Southern Queensland joined Professor Heather Goodall from UTS and Daphne Lowe Kelly from the Chinese Australian Historical Society to discuss the White Australia Policy in Australian politics, and in particular her research on Arthur Calwell. Calwell became Minister for Immigration in Ben Chifley's post-war Labor government.


Event Information
Date
December
Time
2:45 PM
Venue

Australia's tilt on China

December

On January 26, in a speech to the US-Australia Dialogue on Cooperation in the Indo-Pacific in Los Angeles, Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop supported a position where China’s rise is balanced by an expanded US role in the Indo-Pacific region:[1]

Australian attitudes towards China and the United States

December

Last updated June 26 2017.

Despite recent negative publicity in the media, three polls provide evidence of a generally positive view of Australians to China. The polls were undertaken by the United States Studies Centre (USSC) at the University of Sydney; the Lowy Institute for International Policy; and global marketing and opinion research company Ipsos. The three polls also enable comparisons with our attitudes towards the United States.

One Chinese political donation does not a scandal make

December

By Bob Carr

Note: This article appeared in The Australian on June 10 2017.

Let’s be clear. Efforts by any country to subvert Australia should be investigated, monitored and brought to light. Yes, let’s ban donations from non-citizens. Let’s go further still — my own suggestion — and ban any donations that might reasonably be suspected as seeking to influence Australian foreign policy.

Chinese investment and Australian sovereignty

December

By Elena Collinson and James Laurenceson

Note: This article appeared in the University of Nottingham's China Policy Institute: Analysis on June 6 2017.

If Australia listened to our hawks on China, we'd have been hung out to dry

December

By Bob Carr

Note: This article appeared in The Sydney Morning Herald on May 23 2017.

It was like a meeting with an Old Testament prophet. Towering and rock-hewn, Malcolm Fraser was grave, telling me – Australia's new foreign minister – that America was capable of being drawn into a land war with China.

'Going to war with China and losing it. And then withdrawing from Asia.'