Economics

BREXIT and the Australia-China Economic Relationship

December

1. In 2015 the value of Australia’s goods and services exports to the UK stood at $8.8bn and $23.5bn to the EU as a whole. This compares with $91.3bn to China.[1]

2. Over the past decade the value of Australia’s goods and services exports to the UK fell by $0.6bn, while they increased by $0.4bn to the EU as a whole. This compares with an increase of $71.1bn to China.[2]

Don't believe Chinese worker Free Trade Agreement scaremongering

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: This article originally appeared in the Australian Financial Review, June 9 2016.

Remember those claims from some trade unions last year that the China-Australia Free Trade Agreement (ChAFTA) would allow Chinese companies to bring in their own workers?

The Queensland-China Economic Relationship

December

1. The annual value of Queensland’s goods exports to China is $11.6 billion.[1],[2] This compares with –

- $8.1 billion to Japan

- $6.0 billion to Korea

- $5.3 billion to India

2. The annual value of Queensland’s goods exports to China has increased by $4.9 billion over the past five years.[3] Exports to –

- Japan fell by $3.2 billion

- Korea increased by $0.1 billion

GROWING PAINS OF THE CHINESE RENMINBI

December

Few have the insight into the Chinese economy of Dr Guonan Ma. Educated in China and the US, Dr Ma is currently a Visiting Fellow at the Australia-China Relations Institute at UTS and a non-resident scholar at Bruegel, an economic think tank based in Belgium. Dr Ma served as senior economist at the Representative Office for Asia and the Pacific of the Bank for International Settlements for 14 years. Prior to this he was Chief North Asia Economist for investment banks Merrill Lynch, Citigroup and Bankers Trust.


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Date
December
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12:58 AM
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What the Australian public really think about Chinese investment in our maritime ports

December

China’s slowing growth rate is not the hard landing feared

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: This article originally appeared in the Higher View Business magazine, April 2016.

Pick up any major Australian newspaper these days and the business section is sure to be filled with coverage of the latest economic developments in China.

Australia’s fixation with China is justified. 

In 2014-15, Australia’s bilateral trade with China stood at $A149.8bn. That’s more than double the value of trade with Japan, Australia’s second-largest trading partner.

ACRI working paper: Chinese investment in critical infrastructure: much ado about not much?

December

Defence hawks have cited the Northern Territory Government’s decision to lease Port of Darwin to Shandong Landbridge Group in 2015 as reason to call for changes in Australia’s foreign investment approvals regime that would restrict Chinese investment in critical infrastructure assets on security grounds. They have also claimed the support of public opinion. This paper begins by reviewing the security debate around the Darwin Port sale and highlights that the alleged risks raised by critics of the deal have been downplayed by academic experts and leading defence and intelligence figures.

China's energy transition: the way forward

December

On April 5 2016 the Australia-China Relations Institute (ACRI), in partnership with the Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) at UTS, hosted climate and energy policy expert Dr Wang Tao, Assistant Dean of CBN Research Institute and nonresident scholar of Carnegie-Tsinghua Center for Global Policy, for a special look at China's transitioning energy policy and how it fits into the 'new normal' economy.


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Date
December
Time
12:58 AM
Venue

China’s economy: state versus private

December

Just a few decades ago China’s private sector was almost non-existent. How important is it today?

1. In 2014 China economy specialist Nicholas Lardy concluded that the private sector now produces at least two-thirds of China’s GDP.[1]

China has room for policy reform

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: This article originally appeared in the Australian Financial Review, March 10 2016.

China has a choice. It can have higher growth now or higher growth later, but not both.

That's the assessment of many commentators as they watch an investment and industrial output-led economy move towards one led by consumption and services.