Economics

RCEP shows that open regionalism still calls the shots

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: This article appeared in East Asia Forum on June 30 2022. 

Australia and Lithuania: limits of Chinese trade coercion

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: This article appeared in The Council on Geostrategy's online magazine, Britain's World, on June 14 2022.

As the geopolitical distance between Beijing and Western capitals widens, privately-owned companies headquartered in the latter are being warned they might find themselves as collateral damage. 

China is still Australia’s trade frenemy

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: This article appeared in 360info on May 24 2022.

Despite rising geopolitical tensions the evidence of a correlation between political talk and economic connections between trading nations is often overdone.

Will a change of government change the course of Australia-China relations?

December

By Elena Collinson

Note: This article appeared in the Australian Institute of International Affairs’ blog, Australian Outlook, on May 17 2022.

What are the risks of economic exposure to China?

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: This article appeared in Melbourne University's Asialink Insights on April 21 2022.

The PRC's 2022 economic outlook – What Australia needs to know | WEBINAR

December

Lockdowns in centres of commercial activity and no clear national strategy for living with COVID-19 is the latest challenge confronting the People's Republic of China’s (PRC) economy. The potential for geopolitics to spill over to disrupt the PRC's trade and investment has also increased after Beijing refused to condemn the Russian invasion of Ukraine. And none of the structural headwinds facing the PRC economy – US-PRC strategic competition, unfavourable demographics, rising debt, amongst others – have disappeared.


Event Information
Date
December
Time
2:03 AM
Venue

Putting the BRI in perspective: History, hegemony and geoeconomics

December

If successfully realised, the Belt and Road Initiative will be the most ambitious and expansive developmental project the world has ever seen. It is not, however, unprecedented. In the aftermath of the Second World War the United States developed what was then an equally unprecedented and ambitious initiative designed to simultaneously facilitate the (re)development of some of the world’s key economies and reinforce its own position as the leader of the western world. Both the American Marshall Plan and China’s BRI are important expressions of geoeconomic influence and power.

Perspectives | A tale of two Olympics - The Economics of the Beijing Winter Olympics 2022

December

Perspectives is UTS:ACRI's monthly commentary series, featuring a piece on a topical subject in the Australia-China relationship from an invited expert contributor. 

By Tim Harcourt

Demystifying Australia-China trade tensions

December

In 2020 Australia’s political relations with China plumbed new depths. Trade and other economic ties were also hit with disruption. Contributing to this deterioration, and complicating an accurate assessment of the consequences, has been a raft of misunderstandings. This article demystifies the bilateral trade tensions by exposing the deeper drivers of political friction, providing a critical assessment of the vulnerability of the Australian economy, and placing the current state of Australia’s relations with China in a comparative regional perspective.

Australia must learn to navigate the economic realities of China relations

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: This article appeared in East Asia Forum on December 21 2021.