Economics

PRC economic coercion: the recent Australian experience

December

Australia, all is not lost despite China’s trade tantrums

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: This article appeared in the Lowy Institute’s blog, The Interpreter, on September 8 2020. 

中澳关系,智在权衡 PM strikes the right balance in managing China ties (Bilingual)

December

James Laurenceson (罗震) 

This article appeared in The Australian Financial Review on August 27 2020. This article includes a Simplified Chinese translation by Jun Wang, NAATI Level 3 translator (NAATI ID: 80136).

本文于2020年8月27日发表于澳大利亚金融评论。本文由 Jun Wang(NAATI三级翻译员; NAATI ID: 80136)翻译。

管控中澳分歧 Managing China-Australia differences (Bilingual)

December

James Laurenceson (罗震) 

This article appeared in China Daily on August 21 2020. This article includes a Simplified Chinese translation by Jun Wang, NAATI Level 3 translator (NAATI ID: 80136).

Managing China-Australia differences

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: This article appeared in China Daily on August 21 2020. A Simplified Chinese translation is available.

The emissions impact of Australia-PRC trade

December

This factsheet undertakes an examination of the emissions impact of Australia’s trade with the People’s Republic of China (PRC). Trade has the potential to reduce emissions if domestic products are substituted by imported products that have lower ‘embodied emissions’, that is, greenhouse gases (GHGs) released throughout the product’s supply-chain. [1] 

From rocks to science: the irrepressible Australia-China economic relationship

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: This article appeared in The China Story, a blog by the Australian Centre on China in the World and the China Policy Centre, on August 3 2020.

Just rocks, crops and undergraduate commerce degrees?

An update on PRC investment in Australia

December

Investment from the People’s Republic of China (PRC) in Australia continues to be a topic of concern for many Australians. Polling data in 2019 showed that 68 percent of respondents thought that the Australian government is ‘allowing too much investment’ from the PRC.[1] This factsheet provides an update on the current state of play of PRC investment in Australia.

UTS:ACRI WEBINAR: The Australia-China science boom – Report launch

December

In the mid-2000s Australia had delivered a China-led mining boom that continues today. Last year UTS:ACRI researchers drew attention to scientific knowledge being another space where a China boom was unfolding for Australia.


Event Information
Date
December
Time
5:06 AM
Venue

The SA-PRC economic relationship

December

A May 2020 report published by the Australia-China Relations Institute at the University of Technology Sydney pointed to demand from the People’s Republic of China (PRC) – underpinned by deep economic complementarities and purchasing power – as the chief drivers of growth in Australian exports.[1] This extends to South Australia, with a prominent example of this being rapid growth in PRC consumer demand for South Australian wine.