Economics

China trade story takes an unexpected turn

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: This article appeared in The Australian on April 2 2015.

Australia’s exports to China have taken a worrying turn, and the problem isn’t iron ore. 

Playing the China card may win votes, but it’s bad for Australia

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: This article appeared in The Conversation on March 27 2015.

Competition the true marker of Xi Jinping’s economic reforms

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: This article appeared in East Asia Forum on March 24 2015.

The usual assessment of Xi Jinping’s performance as China’s leader goes like this: since taking the reins at the end of 2012 he’s over-delivered on anticorruption and underwhelmed on economic reform. 

China has every incentive to make AIIB work

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: This article appeared in The Australian Financial Review on March 19 2015.

China and the art of muddling through

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: This article appeared in China Spectator on March 16 2015.

There’s been a lot of talk on China Spectator about the country muddling through in 2015.  

As China changes from world’s factory to innovator, Australia needs to keep pace

December

By James Laurenceson and Roy Green

Note: This article appeared in The Conversation on March 16 2015.

New Year celebrations give Chinese economy a hangover

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: This article appeared in The Conversation on February 24 2015.

Are the Chinese still getting bang for their investment buck?

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: This article appeared in Business Spectator on February 16 2015.

It’s the trillion dollar question about China’s economy.  

The country is still investing but are the returns anywhere near what they used to be? 

What everyone overlooked in China’s GDP numbers

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: This article appeared in Business Spectator on January 27 2015.

We’ve missed it.  

China’s growth numbers for 2014 were released on Tuesday. But so far all the talk has been about them showing the economy expanding at its slowest pace in 24 years.   

Still plenty of growth to come from China

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: The online version of this article appeared in The Australian Financial Review on January 20 2015.

The World Bank and the IMF have cut their forecasts for Chinese growth. But with a trade deal in the bag, China still looks set to deliver for the Australian economy.