Journal publications

The Chinese economy: crisis, control, recovery, refocus

December

This book chapter recaps and unpacks a year of crisis, control, recovery and refocus in the People’s Republic of China’s (PRC) economy, drawing implications for the global economy and Australia.

Interrogating Chinese economic coercion: the Australian experience since 2017

December

This paper begins by critically reviewing the theoretical basis underpinning use of economic coercion to shift a target country’s political positions, drawing attention to the likelihood of success being context-dependent. Six case studies are then documented where a coercive frame is evident in reporting and commentary to interpret Chinese actions taken against Australian exports since 2017. These show that trade impacts of Chinese actions have generally been modest in scale, short-lived and/or significantly mitigated.

Dynamics of Australia's LNG export performance: A modified constant market shares analysis

December

With continuous growth, the global LNG market is becoming increasingly competitive over time, and Australia is at the forefront. This paper makes the first attempt to analyse the dynamics of Australia's LNG export performance, using an improved Constant Market Share (CMS) model and UN Comtrade LNG trade data in four sub-periods spanning 1989 to 2017.

Campus conundrums: clashes and collaborations

December

This book chapter examines the challenges faced by Australian universities as they navigate issues around free speech on campuses and research collaboration with the People’s Republic of China (PRC). The University of Queensland (UQ) serves as a case in point, with debates around protests and counter-protests supported by the PRC’s Consul-General in Brisbane raising questions around free speech and foreign interference by the PRC government in Australian universities.

Quantification of fresh water consumption and scarcity footprints of hydrogen from water electrolysis: A methodology framework

December

Australia aims to be a major global player in the hydrogen market by 2030. Hydrogen exports – particularly to East Asian economies such as China – are expected to substitute coal and natural gas exports, thereby sustaining the Australian economy. Using a comprehensive new methodology, the authors estimate the respective life-cycle water consumption of three hydrogen production technologies – grid electricity, solar and wind powered  – as well as the distribution of water consumption across Australia, China and the rest of the world.

Australian and People's Republic of China government conceptions of the international order

December

Through qualitative comparative analysis of policy documents and official statements over the last 10 years (2008–2018), this paper examines Australian and PRC government conceptions of the international order and the associated policy implications. Their understandings of the international order are informed by their self-defined national role conceptions and perceptions of other states, and are manifested in discussions of institutional reform, international law and human rights.

Can energy-price regulations smooth price fluctuations? Evidence from China’s coal sector

December

Due to the dominance of coal in China’s energy mix, coal prices have always been a challenging part of pricing reform. The recent frequent government interventions raise the key research questions: what is the actual impact of price policies on coal price fluctuations, and how can forward-looking pricing policies be made? By proposing a novel classification of coal pricing policies and introducing an expectation and forward-looking coefficient, the paper examines the relationship between coal price fluctuations and pricing policies using the generalised method of moments (GMM) method.

Chinese investment in Australian infrastructure assets: Accounting for local public preferences

December

Chinese investment in Australian infrastructure assets can bring economic benefits for both countries. However, it can also create domestic political challenges. This is because Australian public support for foreign investment in infrastructure is limited. In order to better inform public policy and firm decision-making in both China and Australia, this paper undertakes a choice modelling analysis of original survey data to determine the drivers of local public preferences.

Are China's exports crowding out or being crowded out? Evidence from Japan's imports

December

Many high income countries, including Australia, have concerns that their exports might be displaced by those from China. New UTS:ACRI research finds that China’s rise up the global value chain is likely to be a slow and gradual process. In fact, China’s own exports at lower quality points are now being displaced by other countries.

The evolution of Malcolm Fraser's China policy

December

This article explores the evolution of Malcolm Fraser's views on China. While Gough Whitlam is fondly remembered as a trailblazer for normalising Australia‐China relations, Fraser was a pioneer in rendering a sense of bipartisanship in Australia's China policy. Fraser was not initially a Sino‐enthusiast, however. He came from a background of staunch anti‐Communism and throughout the 1950s and 1960s believed that China posed a major threat to stability in the Asia Pacific.