ACRI Opinion

Barnaby Joyce’s mixed messaging on property rights

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: This article originally appeared on The Interpreter, the blog of the Lowy Institute for International Policy, October 28 2016.

There’s been a good deal of mixed messaging coming from Australia's Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce recently.

The economy is faltering? Chinese consumers aren’t buying it

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: This article originally appeared in the South China Morning Post, October 19 2016.

Australians must be clear-eyed on China risks

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: This article originally appeared in the Australian Financial Review, October 18 2016. 

Are economists China-blind?

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: This article originally appeared on the East Asia Forum and was reprinted in the Australian Financial Review, October 10 2016.

Just in case, Australia must have Trump's ear

December

By Bob Carr

He’s down in the polls. But Australia must have a diplomatic strategy in case Donald Trump claws himself 270 electoral votes and smirks through a vulgar inauguration.

Abbott injects dose of realism on Australia-China relationship

December

By Bob Carr

Note: This article originally appeared in The Australian, October 4 2016.

Australia’s recent anti-China panic seems to challenge any prospect of a positive relationship with Beijing.

I stood for US alliance as well as our China partnership

December

By Bob Carr

Note: This article originally appeared in The Australian, September 24 2016.

Cold War warriors: Australia’s China panic has gone too far

December

By Bob Carr

Note: This article originally appeared in The Australian, September 10 2016. 

Chinese-language media in Australia: an opportunity for Australian soft power

December

By Wanning Sun

More than ever before, Australia is wedged between its economic dependence on China and its security alliance with the US. How the Chinese-language media in Australia figures in this fraught relationship is no longer just an academic question. 

Some have argued that the sector has become a key tool for China to exert soft power and influence in Australia.

No nostalgia for Mao in the Australian-Chinese community

December

By Bob Carr

No sweeter duty for a Premier. A convention centre packed with families, their youngsters being praised as the highest achievers in the end-of-school exams. A happy annual ritual.

Looking back, one thing stands out about the annual awards for young scholars: the steady rise, in my years, in the number of students with Chinese names (and those with Indian and Vietnamese names).