ACRI Facts

Chinese language competency in Australia

December

1. The Australia in the Asian Century White Paper recognizes the need for an increased linguistic capacity within the Australian population: “Relying on the language capabilities of Asian-Australians for all of Australia’s relationships and engagement will not be adequate. Proficiency in more than one language is a basic skill of the 21st century”.[1]

2. In 2015 3,694,101 students attend school in Australia.[2] Of those:

South China Sea: What's New

December

The joint statement from AUSMIN 2015 commits Australia and the US “to pursue enhanced naval cooperation across all domains, including additional combined training and exercises…”[1]

This language is identical with the language of joint statements from AUSMINs each year from 2011.

The China factor in Australian and global equity markets

December

1. At the end of 2014 China’s holdings of equity securities abroad stood at $US161.3 billion.[1] This was up from zero in 2004 but compares with $US6.7 trillion for the US.[2]

2. China’s holdings of equity securities abroad are equal to 1.6 percent of its GDP.[3] This compares with 38.6 percent for the US. 

China and Australia’s agricultural sector

December

1. Australia’s agricultural exports to China reached $8.5 billion in 2014-15.[1] This compared with:

- $5.1 billion to the US

- $3.9 billion to Japan

- $3.3 billion to Indonesia

2. A Chinese government-owned company wanting to invest in Australia’s agricultural sector must obtain Foreign Investment Review Board (FIRB) approval, irrespective of the value of the proposed purchase.[2]

The China FTA: all the facts and figures

December

1. Critics have called for mandatory labour market testing (LMT) with respect to the China FTA.

Malcolm Turnbull and China

December

On October 5 2011 in a speech to the London School of Economics, Malcolm Turnbull said: “It makes no sense for America, or its allies, to base long-term strategic policy on the contentious proposition that we are on an inevitable collision course with a militarily aggressive China … it is important to note that China’s growth in power, both economic and military, has not been matched by any expansionist tendencies beyond reuniting Taiwan … China has more to lose than most from any conflict that disrupts global economic flows”.[

The China FTA - The State of Play

December

1.In August the IMF said that it expects China’s economy will be 44 percent bigger in 2020.[1]

In the past two years alone it has added spending worth more than Australia’s GDP.[2]

The Chinese Economy: What China is Doing Right

December

1. The latest forecasts from the IMF say that China’s economy will be 44 percent bigger in 2020.[1] This compares with –

  • 16 percent for the U.S[2]
  • 5 percent for Japan[3]
  • 45 percent for India[4]

 

What a China FTA means for Australia and its workers

December

1. China’s economy is worth $A11.6 trillion. In 2014 alone it grew by $A872 billion, more than half the value of Australia’s GDP.[1] The China FTA gives Australia better access to this market than any other country.

The Hawke Government's China Policy

December

Bob Hawke was Prime Minister from 1983 to 1991. During that time he enjoyed a close personal relationship with the Chinese leadership and pioneered the integration of the Australian and Chinese iron and steel industries.

“An unusually close relationship”

On March 5 1983 Bob Hawke won the election and replaced Malcolm Fraser as Prime Minister.