Foreign affairs

Influence creep? Australia well-equipped to hold its own

December

By Elena Collinson and James Laurenceson

Note: This article appeared in the 2017 special edition of the Vision Times, ‘The Giant Awakens: A collection of insights into Chinese government influence in Australia’, on October 1 2017.

Australia-China relations in 2017 – Colin Mackerras in conversation

December

The Australia-China Relations Institute (ACRI) at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) welcomes leading Australian Sinologist Professor Colin Mackerras to speak on developments in contemporary Australia-China relations.


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December
Venue

Robert Macklin - 'Dragon & Kangaroo'

December

The Australia-China Relations Institute (ACRI) at the University of Technology Sydney welcomed author and historian Robert Macklin to discuss his book, Dragon & Kangaroo (Hachette, 2017).


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December
Venue

Why has Australia declared rhetorical war on China?

December

By Bob Carr

This year Australia declared rhetorical war on China.

The words being used by Australian leaders are the harshest any time since diplomatic relations commenced in 1972, with the exception of comments at the time of Tiananmen. The tone is harsher than that of any other US ally, including Japan.

Chinese students in Australia: Do we protest too much?

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: This article appeared in the Lowy Institute for International Policy's blog, The Interpreter, on September 21 2017.

China relations: How Canada does it

December

The Australia-China Relations Institute (ACRI) at the University of Technology Sydney welcomes Canadian scholar Professor Gordon Houlden, a specialist in Canada-China relations, to speak on Canada's experience managing a China policy with reference to Canada's close relationship with the US.

Time: 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

Registration opening soon.

 

About Professor Gordon Houlden


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Date
December
Venue

Why Australia is missing the strategic train in Asia

December

By Bob Carr

Note: This article appeared in The Australian Financial Review on September 14 2017.

Recent Opposition statements on China

December

In July the Australia-China Relations Institute (ACRI) reported on an apparent tilt in the China policy of Canberra, reflected in speeches by Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and Foreign Minister Julie Bishop (see ACRI fact sheet ‘Australia’s tilt on China).[1] Recently, however, the opposition Labor Party appears to be differentiating itself on China policy. This is reflected in three recent speeches by Shadow Minister for Foreign Affairs Penny Wong.

ACRI Chinese History Series: The Chinese and the White Australia Policy

December

On September 13 the Australia-China Relations Institute (ACRI) at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) presented the second event in their Chinese History Series. Dr Jayne Persian from the University of Southern Queensland joined Professor Heather Goodall from UTS and Daphne Lowe Kelly from the Chinese Australian Historical Society to discuss the White Australia Policy in Australian politics, and in particular her research on Arthur Calwell. Calwell became Minister for Immigration in Ben Chifley's post-war Labor government.


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December
Venue

Australia's tilt on China

December

On January 26, in a speech to the US-Australia Dialogue on Cooperation in the Indo-Pacific in Los Angeles, Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop supported a position where China’s rise is balanced by an expanded US role in the Indo-Pacific region:[1]