Business

ACRI emerging leaders networking evening

December

The Australia-China Relations Institute (ACRI) at the University of Technology Sydney welcomed young professionals to an emerging leaders networking evening at NSW Parliament House. The aim of the event was to provide young professionals with an interest in Australia-China relations the chance to connect with others in the space and learn from their insights. ACRI Director Professor Bob Carr spoke on latest developments in Australia-China relations and the work of ACRI.

Time: 6.00pm - 7.30pm


Event Information
Date
December
Venue

Myth-busting Chinese corporations in Australia

December

Among policymakers, media and the broader public, confusion reigns supreme when it comes to Chinese corporations. State-owned enterprises (SOEs) are assumed to be blindly following Chinese Communist Party (CCP) or security service orders with little concern for their own commercial interests. And private Chinese firms are conflated with SOEs and viewed as pawns in the CCP’s regional expansion strategy, despite the enormous growth of the Chinese private sector over the past two decades.

ACRI/Urban Taskforce industry breakfast: Learning from Asian Cities

December

With the increasing relationship between Australia and China comes an opportunity for both countries to learn from each other. A number of large Chinese developers are bringing their skills to Australia and are investing in large projects. There is an increasing investment into Australian property from China.


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Date
December
Venue

Advice to Australian Business: China is still the main game

December

The Australia-China Relations Institute (ACRI) at the University of Technology Sydney presented a panel to assess current economic data from China.The panel explored China's current economic prospects and what it  might mean for Australia, and also discussed the impact of US policies under Trump. 

The panellists were Stuart Fuller, Partner, King & Wood Mallesons; Professor James Laurenceson, Deputy Director, ACRI; and Andrew Parker, Partner, Asia Practice Leader, PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC).


Event Information
Date
December
Venue

Myth-busting Chinese corporations in Australia

December

Among Australian policymakers, media and the broader public, confusion reigns supreme when it comes to Chinese corporations. Chinese state-controlled businesses are assumed to be blindly following Communist Party or security service orders with little concern for their own commerical interests.


Event Information
Date
December
Venue

Australians must be clear-eyed on China risks

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: This article originally appeared in the Australian Financial Review, October 18 2016. 

Innovation and China

December

China is moving aggressively from a strategy of imitation to one of innovation, making itself truly the start-up nation. How prepared is western business for the tidal wave of innovation out of China? What strategies should they settle on?


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Date
December
Venue

The Chinese Concept of 'Face'

December

The Chinese Concept of 'Face': What it Means for Australian Business and Government

Following the success of last year's Sydney seminar, the Australia-China Relations Institute, with the generous support of Holding Redlich, hosted a second instalment of “What is the Chinese concept of 'face'? with Dr Carl Hinze in Melbourne on August 10 2016.


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Date
December
Venue

SMART GROWTH

December

SMART GROWTH: CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR CHINA IN THE AUSTRALIAN PROPERTY SECTOR

Chinese investors have a huge appetite for Australian commercial real estate. The industry attracts the largest share of Chinese direct investment in Australia sitting at 45 percent of total investment in 2015.

The steady flow of investors are looking to develop new urban precincts. How will these investors transform Australian cities? How can the government's 'smart cities' policy make the best use of Chinese capital?


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Date
December
Venue

Australians may not be motivated by racism when it comes to Chinese investment

December

By James Laurenceson

Note: This article originally appeared in The Conversation, April 19 2016.

Do Australian attitudes towards Chinese investment reflect racism? It’s a question I’ve often been asked but it’s a tough one to answer.